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The Saloon And More New Lost Hallow Art by Sarah de Buck

We’ve got a bunch of awesome new artwork by Sarah de Buck including the Saloon, whihc i particularly love. She also included some stuff centered around Miss Helen’s song. I sent her all the songs i have so far. She seemed to rather like that one a lot and thus a bunch of art from it.

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lost hallow art sarah de buck weird west cabaret steampunk

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Posted by on July 20, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Character Sketches: The Alchemist 1 by Sarah de Buck

Character Sketches: The Alchemist 1 by Sarah de Buck

We’re going to pause a second from the stream of consciousness creative writing spree. I mostly needed to create stories for the 4 (maybe 5) characters who are in the Cabaret and give the setting some life, so i set myself the task of sitting down everyday and writing on the Town of Lost Hallow. I did not post everything i wrote, as the full story of the Sheriff and Miss Hannah is best served in the Cabaret itself, but all this other stuff has served to create a much more real place in my head and set out lots of other details to work with should i need.

There are 4 characters in the Cabaret. It’s possible to throw in a 5th. There’s Miss Hannah, Han-Mi, The Sheriff, and an unnamed other male. I asked Sarah de Buck to go ahead and make some character concept art on this 4th male and i would come up with the character story based on looking at her drawings. Which seems a fun idea.

So she has sent me art. And i present it to you. Cause it’s kind of totally awesome and utterly fun.

gothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shaperagothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shaperagothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shaperagothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shaperagothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shaperagothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shaperagothic western steampunk cabaret character concept art sarah de buck paul shapera

 
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Posted by on May 7, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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The Drop Dead Awesome Satirical Art Of Pawel Kuczynski

Drop what you’re doing Right. Now. Look at this.

These are awesome.

This is the work of Polish artist Pawel Kuczynski.

His website is here.

Pawel Kuczynski

 

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Pawel Kuczynski

 

 

 

Pawel Kuczynski

 

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

 

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

Pawel Kuczynski

 
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Posted by on July 20, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Russian Space Art

The Atompunk era is fascinatingly paralleled across much of the planet. As in the west, the soviet block went through a similar arc. The 1950s were prosperous and held the promise of a future without limits.  This led into an optimistic 1960s in which dreams of space were becoming real.. And of course, just like the in the west, over the course of the 1970s it crashed. There are different circumstances and reasons, but i still find an amazing assortment of parallels up until the 80s, and for me the 80s is the atompunk cut off.

I highly recommend the book Red Plenty by Francis Spufford. The book is historical fiction, the specific little stories are made up, but all the details are absolutely real and carefully presented. The book deals with the Soviet optimism of the 50s into the 60s and the details of how and why the dream of the planned economy rose, crested and crashed.

Red Plenty Francis Spufford

“20th-century magic called ‘the planned economy’, which was going to gush forth an abundance of good things that the penny-pinching lands of capitalism could never match. And just for a little while, in the heady years of the late 1950s, the magic seemed to be working.Red Plenty is about that moment in history, and how it came, and how it went away; about the brief era when, under the rash leadership of Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet Union looked forward to a future of rich communists and envious capitalists, when Moscow would out-glitter Manhattan, every Lada would be better engineered than a Porsche and sputniks would lead the way to the stars. And it’s about the scientists who did their genuinely brilliant best to make the dream come true”

You can buy the book here.

But that’s not why we’re here today. While we’re on the topic, let’s check out the soviet space art of Nikolai Kolchitsky.

In the 1950s and 60s Soviet artist Nikolai Kolchitsky was in his prolific heyday, creating visions of outer space for various magazines,  “Technique – Youth”, “Spark”, “Young technician”,  as well as a wealth of illustrated books, short stories, essays. While American pulp mags like Amazing stories featured art that created a sci fi vision for the mind of american youth, Nikolai Kolchitsky was one of the most important pop culture artists doing the same for Russian children dreaming of a future in space where worlds waited to be explored and mankind’s future lead.

Nikolai Kolchitsky died in 1980. Here are his atompunk visions:

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

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Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

Nikolai Kolchitsky russian space art

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Sky Art

Because apparently, why the fuck not.

French artist Lamadieu Thomas takes pictures of constricted urban spaces from below and then… makes… pictures in the… sky… all right just check this out. It is kind of ridiculous and kind of completely awesome at the same time.

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

 

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

sky art Lamadieu Thomas

 
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Posted by on May 9, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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The Dark Fantasy of Fransisco De Goya

The Colossus

The Colossus

The Spanish painter Fransisco de Goya lived from 1746-1828 and painted dark subject material unlike anyone else until well into the 20th century.

The interesting thing is that he was a court painter.In the 1770s he became noticed through his frescos for Cathedrals and designs for tapestries in the royal tapestry factory in Madrid. He soon became established as a portrait painter to the Spanish aristocracy, was elected to the Royal Academy of San Fernando in 1780, named painter to the king in 1786, and made a court painter in 1789.

Charles IV of Spain and His Family,

Charles IV of Spain and His Family,

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Fransisco de Goya

“A serious illness in 1792 left Goya permanently deaf. Isolated from others by his deafness, he became increasingly occupied with the fantasies and inventions of his imagination and with critical and satirical observations of mankind. He evolved a bold, free new style close to caricature. His portraits became penetrating characterizations, revealing their subjects as Goya saw them. In his religious frescoes he employed a broad, free style and an earthy realism unprecedented in religious art.”

Fransisco de Goya

Incantation

Incantation

The violence in Europe surrounding him inspired him to a darker view of humanity. The French Revolution had given way to horrible violence and atrocity, which was followed by the rise of Napolean and his invasion of Spain. After this Spain fell into civil war, and of this upheaval was bloody and chaotic.

The Shootings of May Third 1808

The Shootings of May Third 1808

During the French occupation he painted court paintings for the French, and later, after the Spanish Civil War when the Spanish monarchy was restored, this caused some problems. He was officially pardoned, but the new king wanted no part of him and he was brought before the Inquisition because he had painted a naked woman, something not done in Spain at that time.

Clothed Maya

Clothed Maya

Naked Maya, the first painting in all of western art where a woman has public hair

Naked Maya, the first painting in all of western art where a woman has public hair

Tribunal of the Inquisition

Tribunal of the Inquisition

De Goya lived in seclusion from then on and his paintings went even darker and more fantastic.

Saturn devouring His Sons

Saturn devouring His Sons

Witches In The Air

Witches In The Air

The Witches Sabbath

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The Plague Hospital

Yard With Lunatics

Yard With Lunatics

In 1824, after the failure of an attempt to restore liberal government, Goya went into voluntary exile in France. He settled in Bordeaux, continuing to work until his death there on April 16, 1828.

 
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Posted by on July 29, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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The Art Of Esoteric Symbolism: Jean Delville

Jean Delville was a Belgian painter (1867-1953) who painted heavily symbolic scenes with a occult oriented spiritual perspective.

He grew up in the Belgian town of Louvain, but when his outstanding talent became apparent went to Brussel to study at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts where he stood out and won some awards. He started exhibiting at 20, but it was a few years later that the focus of his work became cemented.

After Academy he traveled to Paris where he met  Sâr Joséphin Péladan, an eccentric mystic and occultist, who defined himself as a modern Rosicrucian. Delville became enamored with Peladan’s ideas and mysticism and from then on Delville dedicated his craft to esoteric themes. In the mid 1890s, shortly before turning 30, Deliville joined the Theosophy movement, whose ideas and interests would inform much of his inspiration.

The basic summation of his views was Neoplatonism, Delville believed that visible reality was only a symbol, and that humans exist in three planes: the physical (the realm of facts), the astral (or spiritual world, the realm of laws), and the divine (the realm of causes). These higher planes of existence were the only significant ones. Materialism was a trap, and the soul had to guard against being trapped by its snares. The human body he considered to a potential prison for the soul.

Let’s look at some of his work, shall we?

Parsifal

“Jean Delville’s drawing of Parsifal was done around 1885 at the height of the Occult Revival in Europe. In this stylized image, he depicts the secret of the dog-headed clairaudience: the eustacian tubes, columns of air that work like antennae to mediate frequencies beyond the range of normal hearing.

He shows the columns shooting down from Parsifal’s ears, and around the head, the horns of clairvoyance, another set of antennae but receptive to light rather than sound, particularly the soft, lunar Organic Light. Delville wanted to depict Parsifal as the example of the trained initiate able to send and receive clairvoyantly and clairaudiently.”

Parsifal

Parsifal

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Prometheus

Begun in 1904–5 and finally completed in 1907, Delville made great efforts to find theosophical significance in the theme of Prometheus. For example, the star taken by Prometheus is also the symbol of the White Order of Brussels. In 1907 the work suddenly took on increased importance with the publication in French of the fourth volume of The Secret Doctrine, in which Helena Blavatski had dedicated an entire chapter to Prometheus. No longer the thief of fire of ancient mythology, Prometheus was from this point on assimilated into theosophy as a prophet, a light bearer, revealing with his theosophical flame the suffering of humanity.

Prometheus

Prometheus

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Orpheus

After being torn apart and decapitated by bacchanals (female followers of Bacchus), Orpheus’ head and lyre were thrown into the river where they eventually washed up on the shore of Lesbos. The head awoke and became an Oracle. The lyre was placed in the night sky as a constellation. For Delville this would be a perfect subject matter. After suffering in the material world, the initiate finally transcends to a state of otherworldly knowledge.

Orpheus

Orpheus

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The Love Of Souls

While lovely and romantic on one hand, this work also portrays the coming together of the female and male aspects of humanity, which only when combined can create the perfect being. This new being is the point of the painting, as the man and woman are actually only the tail, beneath the tail even, of the phoenix which is manifesting above them.

The Love Of Souls

The Love Of Souls

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Satan’s Treasures

Delville’s vast undersea world, ruled by Satan, is almost certainly an image of the material abyss. Satan, lord of the physical realm, presides over its sleeping inhabitants. Wrapped in delusion, the dreaming men and women are mesmerized by Satan’s spell, and trapped by their own desires. Satan’s “treasures” include not only their sensuality, but also their attraction to worldly riches, represented by the pearls, coins, and corals that surround them. Above all, the entranced people themselves are the treasures of Satan.

Satan's Treasures

Satan’s Treasures

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The Age Of Splendor

Delville’s 1894 painting can be seen as an illustration of this next phase of human development, transcending the entrapment of matter.The realm of matter is represented by serpents and tangled thorny roses at the bottom right of the canvas. A male figure, with raised arms and upturned eyes similar to those of Mrs. Stuart Merrill, sits half in and half out of the material realm. On his left, a luminous and almost bodiless female angel rises upward, with the fluid and transparent folds of her dress surrounding the man in a circle of light. A vast landscape spreads out, far below the figures. It is filled with jagged hills similar to those in Satan’s Treasures. Here, however, they are painted in luminous purples and golds and rise out of a bright blue sea.

This scene can be viewed in two ways. If it is inspired by the episode from Schuré’s Initiation of Isis, the man would be the disciple’s discarded earthly self, falling back, and swallowed up by matter. In this case, the angel would be what Schuré describes as “another, purer, more ethereal self,” which has just been born. Alternatively, if the story is not taken directly from Schuré, the angel can be seen as a separate being (perhaps the man’s higher self), guiding him up from the abyss.

The Age Of Splendor Jean Delville

The Age Of Splendor Jean Delville

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The Women of Eleusis

Eleusis is an actual town in Greece, where the Eleusinian Mysteries were centered. So, you all know Elysium? Those of you who have listened to the Steampunk Opera will be more than familiar (and just WAIT til we get to the Atompunk Opera). Elysium is the final resting place of the virtuous. However, it was also specifically  a netherworld realm, located in the depths of Hades beyond the river Lethe. Its fields were promised to initiates of the Mysteries who had lived a virtuous life. In Delville’s worldview this would of course be a transcendent place where the purified initiate might arrive at their destination.

The Women of Eleusis, Jean Delville

The Women of Eleusis

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The Wheel Of Fortune

This painting is AWEsome and it stand pretty self evidently. Thus we bid you adieu on this fine day.

The Wheel Of The World

The Wheel Of The World

 
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Posted by on July 20, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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